History of Philosophy (wykład) - 2019/2020

Course description
General information
Lecturer:dr Piotr Szałek
Organising unit:Faculty of Law, Canon Law and Administration - Instytut Nauk Prawnych
Number of hours (week/semester): 3/45
Language of instruction:English
Course objective
C1 – the first aim is to give an account of the fundamental streams in philosophy and of essential philosophical concepts which philosophers elaborated from the ancient to contemporary times.
C2 – the second aim is to enable students to acquire skills necessary for both analytic and synthetic way of thinking and a good argumentative and critical competence.
Prerequisites
W1 – basic knowledge in the liberal arts.
Learning outcomes
KNOWLEDGE
1. Student has general knowledge in the field of arts (in philosophy) - K_W02

SKILLS
1. Student is able to analyse the fundamental social, political and economic processes in the international, regional and state scale - K_U01

SOCIAL COMPETENCES
1. Student has a competence with creative participation in job market - K_K01
2. Student is able to cooperate in the group and to coordinate of the group working - K_K02
Teaching method
(1) Traditional lecture, (2) Interactive methods, (3) Elements of multimedia displays or handouts.
Course content description
The lecture is providing a course of the history of philosophy through the major themes and philosophers. It consists of the main philosophical standpoints such as, among others, of Plato and Aristotle, St Thomas Aquinas, two main streams in modern philosophy: Continental Rationalism and British Empiricism, I. Kant, G. W. Hegel, A. Comte, F. Nietzsche, American Pragmatism, Phenomenology, Analytic Philosophy, and Existentialism. It gives a tool for critical thinking and deeper self-consciousness as regards different opinions and ideas.
Forms of assessment
Fail:
(W) – student does not have a basic knowledge on history of philosophy
(U) – student does not have a competence in analysing the lecture’s contents and does not understand the basic content of the lecture; student is not able to offer any conceptual solution for the discussed problem
(K) – student is not engaged in the process of acquiring the knowledge offered within lecture and does not fulfil lecture’s aims and tasks, does not engage himself into the discussion of the raised problems

Barely Pass
(W) – student gained general but limited knowledge on history of philosophy
(U) – student barely can analyse and understand contents of the lecture; with a tutor’s assistance student is able to analyse and reconstruct the contents.
(K) – student attends the lecture, but is passive

Good Pass
(W) – student has gained a good knowledge on history of philosophy
(U) – student is able easily to demonstrate his knowledge on history of philosophy and is able to apply the knowledge to a problematic situation; student can analyse raised problems without any serious difficulty
(K) – student is active at the lecture and is willing to broaden his knowledge

Very Good Pass
(W) – student has systematized and wide knowledge on history of philosophy
(U) – student is highly competent as regards the lecture and is able easily to refer to its content and the reading list sources
(K) – student is very active at the lectures and takes an initiative with broadening his knowledge
Required reading list
The Primary Reading List:
(1) R.H. Popkin (ed.), The Columbia History of Western Philosophy, New York: Columbia University Press 2006; (2) A. Kenny, An Illustrated Brief History of Western Philosophy, Oxford: Blackwell 1999; (3) A. Kenny, A New History of Western Philosophy, Oxford-New York: Oxford University Press 2012.

The Secondary Reading List:
(1) A. Kenny, Ancient Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 1, New York: Oxford University Press 2004; (2) A. Kenny, Medieval Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 2, New York: Oxford University Press 2005; (3) A. Kenny, The Rise of Modern Philosophy: A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 3, New York: Oxford University Press 2006; (4) A. Kenny, Philosophy in the Modern World: A New History of Western Philosophy, Vol. 4, New York: Oxford University Press 2008; (5) F. Copleston, History of Philosophy, 9 vols (various editions); (6) B. Russel, History of Western Philosophy (various editions); (7) É. Gilson, History of Christian Philosophy in the Middle Ages, New York: Random House 1953; (8) Classical philosophical works by Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Kant, Hegel, Comte, Marx, Nietzsche, Husserl, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Levinas (further details on required reading selections from the works will be given at the lecture); (9) Selected essays from the Cambridge Companions series, especially from those on Plato (R. Kraut), Aristotle (J. Barnes), Augustine (N. Kretzmann, E. Stumpf), Aquinas (E. Stumpf, N. Kretzmann), Descartes (J. Cottingham), Kant (P. Guyer), Hegel (F. Beiser), Marx (T. Carver); (10) Relevant entries from the Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy and the online Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy (http//plato.stanford.edu/).
Field of study: Biotechnology
Course listing in the Schedule of Courses:
Year/semester:Year II - Semester 4
Number of ECTS credits: 3
Form of assessment: Examination
Field of study: European Studies
Course listing in the Schedule of Courses:
Year/semester:Year II - Semester 4
Number of ECTS credits: 3
Form of assessment: Examination