Positive psychology (wykład) - 2018/2019

Course description
General information
Lecturer:dr hab. Mariola Łaguna prof. KUL
Organising unit:Faculty of Social Sciences - Instytut Psychologii
Number of hours (week/semester): 30
ECTS code:00000-05-0502WYK0000
Language of instruction:English
Course objective
The aims of this lecture are:
C1 - to provide a comprehensive introduction to the research, theory and intellectual position of positive psychology.
C2 - to explore the assessment of positive psychology constructs.
Prerequisites
Skills of communication in English
Learning outcomes
- Students will know the main ideas of positive psychology movement, and key leaders of positive psychology movement. They will be able to define main positive psychology constructs, e.g. hope, optimism.
- Students will be able to identify the methods used for assessment of positive psychology constructs, and to summarize core research findings in the field of positive psychology.
- The active participation in this course will enhance students’ general skills of communication in English at the field of psychology.
Teaching method
Lecture with multimedia presentation, films and audio recordings
Course content description
Course description
Lecture 1. General introduction – the aims and objectives of the lecture, prerequisites, assessment method.
Lecture 2. Introduction - the field of positive psychology, general ideas, representatives, links between different concepts, current discussions.
Lecture 3.
Optimism - Scheier and Carver\'s conception of the optimism, optimism in the Seligman\'s conception, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in these theories, applications.
Lecture 4. Hope - the Snyder\'s concept of hope, Trzebiński and Zięba\'s basic hope conception, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in these theories, applications.
Lecture 5. Self-efficacy - Bandura\'s conception of self-efficacy, general and specific self-efficacy, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in the theory, applications.
Lecture 6. Self-esteem - low, high, optimal self-esteem and its consequences, method of measure, empirical research, applications.
Lecture 7. Positive emotions - the role of positive emotions in humans\' functioning - Fredrickson\'s explanations, method of measure, empirical research, applications.
Lecture 8. Mindfulness - the Ryan and Deci\'s concept of mindfulness, the McCullough\'s concept of mindful attentiveness, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in these theories, applications.
Lecture 9. Flow - the Csikszentmihalayi\'s concept of flow, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in the theory, applications.
Lecture 10. Gratitude - McCullough, Emmons, and Tsang\'s conception of the grateful disposition, methods of measure, empirical research grounded in the theory, applications.
Lecture 11. Happiness - the approaches to happiness and subjective well-being, global assessment of life satisfaction, method of measure, empirical research.
Lecture 12. Goals - Little\'s conception of personal projects, Locke and Latham\'s goal setting theory, Gollwitzer\'s model of action phases, methods of measure, empirical research, applications.
Lecture 13. Strenghts and virtues - Peterson and Seligman\'s conception, Linley\'s conception, methods of measure, empirical research, applications.
Lecture 14. Summary - positive diagnosis, history and critique of positive psychology movement.
Lecture 15. Summary – final discussion with “check yourself” questions.
Forms of assessment
After finishing this lecture students will be able:
- to describe the main ideas of positive psychology movement,
- to identify key leaders of positive psychology movement,
- to define main positive psychology constructs, e.g. hope, optimism,
- to identify the methods used for assessment of positive psychology constructs,
- to summarize core research findings in the field of positive psychology,
Required reading list
Required reading list:
Held, B.S. (2004). The negative side of positive psychology. Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 44 , 9-46.
Seligman, M.E. & Csikszentmihalayi, M. (2000). Positive psychology: An introduction. American Psychologist, 55, 5-14.

Additional reading list
Bandura, A. (2001). Social cognitive theory: An agentic perspective. Annual Review of Psychology, 52, 1-26.
Brissette, I., Scheier, M. F., Carver, Ch. S. (2002). The role of optimism in social network development, coping, and psychological adjustment during life transition. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82 (1), 102-111.
Kernis, M. H. (2003). Toward a conceptualization of optimal self-esteem. Psychological Inquiry, 14 (1), 1-26.
Linley, P. A., & Joseph, S. (Eds.) (2004). Positive psychology in practice. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.
McCullough, M. E. (2002). Savoring life, past and present: explaining what hope and gratitude share in common. Psychological Inquiry, 13 (4), 302-304.
McCullough, M. E., Emmons, R.A., Tsang, J. (2002). The grateful disposition: A conceptual and empirical topography. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 82, 112-127.
Ryan, E.L., Deci, R.M. (2000). Human needs and the self-determination of behavior. Psychological Inquiry, 11 (4), 277-298.
Seligman, M. E. (1991). Learned optimism. New York: Knopf.
Scheier, M. F., Carver, Ch. S. (1985). Optimism, coping, and health: generalized outcome expectancies. Health psychology, 4 (3), 219-247.
Snyder, C. R. (2002). Hope theory: rainbows in the mind. Psychological Inquiry, 13 (4), 249-275.
Trzebiński, J., Zięba, M. (2004). Basic hope as a world-view: an outline of a concept. Polish Psychological Bulletin, 35 (3), 173-182.

Contact: laguna@kul.pl
Field of study: Psychology
Course listing in the Schedule of Courses:
Year/semester:Year I - Semester 1
Number of ECTS credits: 6
Form of assessment: Examination
Year/semester:Year II - Semester 3
Number of ECTS credits: 6
Form of assessment: Examination
Year/semester:Year III - Semester 5
Number of ECTS credits: 6
Form of assessment: Examination
Year/semester:Year IV - Semester 7
Number of ECTS credits: 6
Form of assessment: Examination